All posts by msoos

IT Security Differently

Compliance and regulations are one way to achieve IT security. If one looks at industries that have been around for a very long time, and have very high stakes, for example commercial airline travel, mining, oil&gas, etc., one can find compliance and regulations everywhere. It’s how safety is managed in these environments. I have always been fascinated with safety incidents and read a lot of reports around them — these are almost always free to read and very detailed, unlike IT security incident reports. See for example the now very famous Challenger Accident Report (“For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled.”) or the similarly famous, and more recent AF-447 accident report. These are fascinating reads and if you are willing to read between the lines, they all talk about systems issues — not a single person making a single mistake.
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Testing and pentesting, a road to effectiveness

I have been involved in computer security and security testing for a while and I think it’s time to talk about some aspects of it that get ignored, mostly for the worse. Let me just get this out of the way: security testing (or pentesting, if you like) and testing are very closely related.

The Testing Pyramid

What’s really good about security testing being so close to testing is that you can apply the standard, well-know and widely used techniques from testing to the relatively new field of security testing. First of all, this chart:

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Non-reproducible results with MapleCOMSPS

I’ve been reading through the source code of the 2016 SAT Competition Main Track winner, MapleCOMSPS_DRUP, and I found that it has an important piece of code, regulating its behaviour that depends on timing:

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Why Most Published Research Findings Are False

I read this paper about most research findings being false. Given that most research papers in SAT take a sample size that is incredibly small (especially considering that it’s cheap to have large sample sizes relative to, e.g. medical trials), and the samples are very often hand-picked, it’s easy to see why this could be the case. But that article lists a number of other factors, too, and they are interesting to consider as well. Only few true innovations stick around in SAT (glues, VSIDS, UIP, restarts, etc). Most are forgotten because, frankly, they didn’t show the promise they purported to have. It’d be interesting to force authors to e.g. run their systems on much large sample sizes (e.g. 2-3000 instances from SAT competitions) with much longer timeouts (e.g. 5000s). Then those implementing SAT solvers wouldn’t have to wade through piles of articles to get to something worth implementing. One is allowed to dream.

CryptoMiniSat 5.0.1 released — with MIT license

A new version of CryptoMiniSat, 5.0.1 has been released. It is essentially only a release to mark the move to a much more permissive, MIT license. I am changing the license so that everyone can use the system as they wish, however they wish. I want to give back to the community I have been part of for so long, and so I am making this change. Thank you all for using the solver, it makes me happy that I have been able to help some with my hobby work.